Future Events Programme
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Feb

02

10:30

Charles Lamb (1893-1964) RHA RUA: Capturing the West of Ireland in Paint

Dr Marie Bourke, Cultural Historian & Author, Former Keeper & Head of Education at the National Gallery of Ireland

  • 📅Thursday, February 2, 2023
  • 🕥10:30 - 12:30
  • 🏟Bray Golf Club(map)

Join Marie Bourke, who has written on Charles Lamb, most recently in the Irish Arts Review (2019, Vol 34 (4)), for an illustrated talk on the life and career of Lamb, who was born in Portadown, Co Armagh, educated in Belfast and Dublin, painted in Ireland, France, and Germany, and lived in Carraroe, Co Galway, where he died.

Discover the leading 20th century artist Charles Lamb whose output encompassed portraits, still-life, Breton subjects, western and northern landscapes, harbour, and fishing scenes, as well as depictions of the Famine, and the Claddagh. Marie will explore his role as a painter, whose work formed part of an early 20th century search for an Irish identity, through his portrayal of the West of Ireland landscape, seascape, its people, and their lifestyle that he felt represented the ‘national essence’ of Ireland. In his lifetime his work was shown throughout Ireland, in London, Europe and the United States and, today Lamb is represented in all the national collections.

Marie - who previously delivered a very well-received talk on the artist Frederick William Burton to our Bray Heads U3A group in April 2021 on Zoom - but who will be with us in person at Bray Golf Club this time - is a cultural historian and, former Keeper-Head of Education at the National Gallery of Ireland. The author of The Story of Irish Museums 1790-2000 (Cork University Press, 2011, 2013), she curated the NGI’s recent Frederic William Burton exhibition For the Love of Art. She is an Assessor on the Heritage Council’s Museum Standards Programme and on the board of the National Library of Ireland.’

Photos: Dr Marie Bourke; and Charles Lamb painting, A Quaint Couple, 1930. Collection Crawford Art Gallery, Cork. © Laillí Lamb de Buitlear


Feb

16

10:30

How We Can Secure Ireland’s Energy Future

Don Moore, Former Head of ESB International

  • 📅Thursday, February 16, 2023
  • 🕥10:30 - 12:30
  • 🏟Bray Golf Club(map)

Ireland’s energy future faces unprecedented challenges. The Government's Climate Action Plan requires that we add an additional 10GW of renewable electricity, on-shore and off-shore wind and solar to the grid. This will also require a major upgrade to the transmission grid which is likely to provoke public opposition. More gas-fired generation will be required to back up this renewable generation. The responsible government agencies have recently failed in their attempts to put this in place, putting the country at risk of load shedding over the next few years. Ireland’s gas supplies are also at risk due to a failure to issue licences for gas exploration and a refusal to allow an LNG import facility. The era when energy supply was deregulated and freely traded is likely to come to end in Europe as countries protect their resources. In suggesting solutions, the presenter will draw on his 50 years experience in the energy sector in Ireland and overseas.

Don Moore, whos is a member of The Bray Heads, started his engineering career with ESB working on the construction of Turlough Hill Pumped Storage Scheme in Co Wicklow. He followed this working as a design engineer on thermal power stations such as Poolbeg and Shannonbridge. In 1981 he joined ESB International. ESBI undertook energy projects in over 90 countries in Europe, North America, Asia and the Middle East. He had a particular 20 year involvement in assisting Vietnam in rebuilding its energy infrastructure destroyed in the war. As Managing Director he was responsible for the development of large ESBI owned gas-fired power stations in Spain and Northern Ireland. Since 2012 he has chaired the Energy & Climate Action Committee of the Irish Academy of Engineering


Feb

23

11:30

Guided tour of the Irish Jewish Museum, 3 Walworth Road, off Sth Circular Road, near Portobello, Dublin 8

Irish Jewish Museum guide

  • 📅Thursday, February 23, 2023
  • 🕥11:30 - 12:45

We are extremely lucky to have a guided tour of the Irish Jewish Museum on Thursday, 23rd February, 2023 at 11.30am. The Museum is not normally open on Thursdays at this time of year but the volunteers at the Museum have very kindly agreed to facilitate us.

Officially opened in 1985, the IJM is housed in a former Synagogue which consisted of two adjoining terraced houses constructed in the 1870s. The IJM contains a substantial collection of memorabilia relating to the Irish Jewish communities and associations on the island of Ireland.

On our tour we will have an introductory talk upstairs in the Synagogue followed by a guided tour of the display. Please note that there is one staircase to climb.

The tour will take about 1 hour and 15 minutes.

Fee €12 per person (pay in cash on the day) and is limited to 30 people.

The Museum conducts an ongoing programme of conservation and preservation of artefacts including books, textiles and sacred furniture and was awarded first place for Dublin City in the Heritage Week Awards 2021 for a presentation of their Photographic Collection. The presentation can be found on this page:

https://jewishmuseum.ie/a-glimpse-into-the-past-highlights-from-the-photographic-collection-of-the-irish-jewish-museum/

You can discover more about the Jewish diaspora and explore the Museum collection on the excellent website jewishmuseum.ie

This a terrific opportunity to visit a Museum in Dublin which preserves an important part of Ireland’s cultural and historic heritage and to have a guided tour is a real bonus – it would be a shame to miss it!

To book your place send an email as soon as possible to info@thebrayheadsu3a.ie with ‘IJM tour’ in the Subject heading.


Mar

02

10:30

Irish State-Building in the early 1920s

Frank Sheridan, Former Ambassador, Researcher & Bray Heads U3A Member

  • 📅Thursday, March 2, 2023
  • 🕥10:30 - 12:30
  • 🏟Bray Golf Club(map)

In this Decade of Centenaries, one of the most important commemorations has to be the foundation and building of the new Irish state. The state created by the Anglo-Irish Agreement of 6th December 1921 was a fundamental contrast to the home rule offered in 1912. The latter was in reality a form of devolved local government. The Free State had control of its own internal and foreign affairs, albeit with the latter limited by the constraints of dominion status under the British Commonwealth. It could and did raise an army; raise and control its own taxes; fund its services; and implement land reform. The new government oversaw the transfer to Irish control of all property, personnel and services previously under the control of Britain; it created a new police force. It also created new ministries and managed its relations within the Commonwealth. A wide body of legislation was drafted and passed to give effect to these transfers and innovations. And all this was done by a group of people - acting under the threat of and later the reality of civil war and against a background of partition - people who had previously held neither political nor ministerial office. This presentation seeks to tell their story.

Frank is a former Irish diplomat, who retired after a busy and distinguished career as Ambassador to Brazil in 2014. In retirement continues his busy life, beginning with completing a Masters in contemporary Irish history in TCD. He has also served as a researcher for a documentary on the work of John Hume in creating an Irish lobby in the US; and also with the late Seamus Mallon, former Deputy First Minister in Northern Ireland, for his memoir on his political life. For over two years, Frank worked in the Department of Foreign Affairs overseeing the release of files on the peace process to the National Archives. In 2020, he edited for publication a memoir by a British diplomat, Sir David Goodall, on the negotiation of the Anglo-Irish Agreement of 1985. Currently he is part of a team working for the National Archives in Ireland, Britain and Northern Ireland to create a schools’ package to commemorate the 25th anniversary of the Good Friday Agreement.

Frank and his wife Rita are long-term residents of Bray and we are delighted to that they are also members of our Bray Heads U3A group!


Mar

16

10:30

Enjoying Claret in Georgian Ireland

Dr Patricia McCarthy

  • 📅Thursday, March 16, 2023
  • 🕥10:30 - 12:30
  • 🏟Bray Golf Club(map)

Following up on the excellent talk which Patricia delivered to our group on 'Life in the Country House in Georgian Ireland' on Zoom in 2021, we are delighted that she has agreed to inform and entertain us again - this time in person - with the story of the popularity of claret wine in the Georgian age in Ireland, drawing on her latest, beautifully illustrated, book of this name.

So much red wine from Bordeaux was consumed by Ireland’s nobility and gentry in the 18th century that Jonathan Swift referred to it as ‘Irish wine’ in his letters, in the full knowledge that his correspondent would understand that he meant claret. While the poorer classes in Ireland drowned their sorrows with home-distilled whiskey, the upper classes enjoyed French wine supplied to them by the Irish families who had established themselves in the wine business in Bordeaux. Vast amounts of claret were consumed not only in domestic settings, in clubs and associations, but also at Dublin Castle where the popularity of a lord lieutenant was judged on his generosity with the contents of his cellar – indeed this resulted in the premature death of one at the tender age of 33. Not surprisingly, gout was rampant, but so were the ‘cures’ for it!

Dr Patricia McCarthy is the author of ‘A Favourite Study’: building the King’s Inns (Dublin 2006); Life in the Country House in Georgian Ireland (New Haven & London, 2016), and Enjoying Claret in Georgian Ireland: a history of amiable excess (Dublin, 2022)


Mar

30

10:30

The Beatles

William Hennigan

  • 📅Thursday, March 30, 2023
  • 🕥10:30 - 12:30
  • 🏟Bray Golf Club(map)

Details following


Apr

13

10:30

The Sources of Modern Russian Nationalism

Professor Emerita - and Bray Heads U3A Member - Judith Devlin

  • 📅Thursday, April 13, 2023
  • 🕥10:30 - 12:30
  • 🏟Bray Golf Club(map)

Mr Putin’s thoughts on Russian identity and history (and on Ukraine’s non-existence) in summer 2021 came as a surprise to those who think that Russian nationalism was not a factor in his outlook or indeed in modern Russian history. This talk will look at the roots of Russian nationalism in the 19th century and 20th centuries and its contribution to the current crisis.

We will discuss briefly its inception during the Napoleonic wars and the debates about Russian identity which animated the educated elites in the middle of the century. Official nationality policy under the Tsars was repudiated by Lenin but did Greater Russian nationalism (a quasi-imperial nationalism) really disappear and how did Ukraine fare under the Soviets? We’ll discuss post-war Soviet Russian nationalism and conclude with a brief look at its post-Soviet forms and influence.

Judith Devlin is Professor Emerita in modern history in University College Dublin. She has published books and articles on French and Soviet history. Her most recent publications are: World War 1 in Central and Eastern Europe co-edited with John Paul Newman and Maria Falina (London, New York, I.B. Tauris, 2018, Bloomsbury, 2019 pbk); ‘The Stalin Cult in Comparative Context’ in Susan Grant and James Ryan eds, Revisioning Stalin and Stalinism: Complexities, Contradictions and Controversies (London, Bloomsbury, 2020). Her research focusses on Soviet and Russian political culture and, in particular, the Stalin cult.


Apr

27

10:30

A Passion for Craft

Mary Gallager, The Blue Egg Craft Gallery, Wexford

  • 📅Thursday, April 27, 2023
  • 🕥10:30 - 12:30
  • 🏟Bray Golf Club(map)

Details Following


May

11

10:30

The Kennedys of Mount Kennedy

Therese Hicks

  • 📅Thursday, May 11, 2023
  • 🕥10:30 - 12:30

Have you ever wondered who the ‘Kennedys’ in Newtownmountkennedy were? Where were they from? How did they come to own so much land (13,000 acres!) in Wicklow? And what happened to the family’s descendants? The answers to these questions, and much more, are to be presented in this talk by Therese Hicks, author of No Mere Irish: The Kennedys of Mount Kennedy, recently published by Wordwell Books.

To satisfy your curiosity and to discover more about this ambitious seventeenth-century Irish family of Gaelic background, please come and join us for this informative and entertaining talk on 11th May.

Therese Hicks, originally from the US, has also lived in West Africa, and emigrated to Ireland in 1998. She has MAs in theology and counselling psychology. After retiring from the HSE as a psychotherapist, she returned to her interest in history, and has been engaged in local history research since 2014. She is the author of two books – Spirituality: A User’s Guide, and No Mere Irish: The Kennedys of Mount Kennedy.

Copies of No Mere Irish: The Kennedys of Mount Kennedy will be available at the lecture.


May

25

10:30

Artificial Intelligence (title to be confirmed)

Dr Owen Conlan, Professor in Computer Science, TCD

  • 📅Thursday, May 25, 2023
  • 🕥10:30 - 12:30
  • 🏟Bray Golf Club(map)

Details Following


Jun

08

10:30

Finding My Grandparents in Assam, India

Liz McManus, Writer - and much more

  • 📅Thursday, June 8, 2023
  • 🕥10:30 - 12:30
  • 🏟Bray Golf Club(map)

Details following


Jun

22

10:30

TBD

Fergus Finlay, journalist and commentator

  • 📅Sunday, June 22, 2223
  • 🕥10:30 - 12:30

Details following





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